presentations

hingo's picture

Impress.js: Community contributions is so much fun!

During June-July I had pretty much completed adding the features that I myself had in mind impress.js (as you might have read on this blog back then). Some of those features of course had been asked for multiple times by others as well, in particular the ability to define slide positions relative to the previous slide, was a popular request, with several pull requests proposing it as well. Now that I've added such a plugin, I have to say it is indeed much more convenient way of authoring presentations.

hingo's picture

Authoring Impress.js presentations in Markdown

With the Euro Cup 2016 done, evenings can again be spent contributing to my favorite open source project: The impress.js presentation framework. In the series of blog posts about my additions to it, it is now time to unveil a feature I added by popular request: Markdown support.

Thanks again to the power of open source, this was easy to add. By integrating Markdown.js as an extra addon, you can now type Markdown instead of HTML in each impress.js step:

hingo's picture

Features I've added to Impress.js (and the Plugin API)

This is the third post in my series of blog posts on Impress.js. As I've already mentioned, I've also written some new code to impress.js. Now I want to finally present the new features I've added (currently available in my github fork).

Prologue

hingo's picture

Creating Impress.js presentations in colored JSON with Highlight.js

Last month I wrote about impress.js, and how I've started using it for my presentations. This has been going well, and during the past month I've actually given 2 more presentations using impress.js:

Dreams and fears of a database consultant
MongoDB and GIS

(You really have to click those links, embedding these presentations wouldn't make them justice!)

hingo's picture

Upgrading to more impressive presentations: impress.js

In terms of using an open source desktop, Sun releasing OpenOffice some 15 (?) years ago was an important milestone, comparable to Mozilla finally managing to produce a working browser in Firefox. It provided essentially feature parity with Microsoft office, and most importantly, decent compatibility with Microsoft's own proprietary file formats.

I've used OpenOffice, and now LibreOffice, for lots of non-trivial tasks, including writing a complete book. Sure, the UI toolkit was stuck in the 90's, and Sun wasn't really a good steward in pushing the code base into this century, but it did work.

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