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Helsinki MySQL User Group: Lari Pulkkinen shares experiences with adopting SSD

The next Helsinki MySQL User Group is set for Tuesday, February 19. Lari Pulkkinen from Arbitron Mobile will talk about their project adopting SSD disks for better MySQL performance. Yes, there are benchmarks included.

Note the changed location: Oracle office in Gräsantörmä 2, Espoo. We are glad to have Oracle Finland sponsoring the user group by taking turns as meetup host. Food and sauna will be available after the talk as is customary.

More details and signup at Meetup.com.

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On cryptographic e-voting algorithms in general

It's been a few months ago that I wrote a series of blog posts about Solon Voting. Solon is a project I started in July to implement cryptographically secure e-voting for direct democracy platforms, in particular Liquid Feedback which is used by the Pirate Party and other organizations in Central Europe. In the previous posts I already covered how delegated voting works, and how to divert the data flow of Liquid Feedback so that the voting phase could be handled by a cryptographically secure e-voting module. In the last post I then went on to look at requirements for secure e-voting. Those requirements are frequently referenced in this post.

Having laid out the requirements, I want to spend this post on briefly talking about the algorithms that exist for cryptographically secure e-voting. This is very superficial of course, it's intended to be layman understandable for those that don't really want to read the highly mathematical academic papers on the topic. If you do want to read academic papers, you can find lots of them on Google Scholar, just search for "e-voting" and you're all set for months to come! (No, I'm not qualified to recommend you any good papers. Just go and Google for something just like I did and if you find something interesting, let me know!)

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Notes from MySQL Conference 2012 - Part 2, the hard part

This is the second and final part of my notes from the MySQL conference. In this part I'll focus on the technical substance of talks I saw, and didn't see.

More than ever before I was a contributor rather than attendee at this conference. Looking back, this resulted in seeing less talks than I would have wanted to, since I was speaking or preparing to speak myself. Sometimes it was worse than speaking, for instance I spent half a day picking up pewter goblets from an egnravings shop... (congratulations to all the winners again :-) Luckily, I can make up for some of that by going back and browse their slides. This is especially important whenever 2 good talks are scheduled in the same slot, or in the same slot when I was to speak. So I have categorized topics here along various axes, but also along the "things I did see" versus "things I missed" axis.

My own talks

Tutorial: Evaluating MySQL High Availability alternatives
Using and Benchmarking Galera in Different Architectures

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MySQL progress in a year

Usually people do this around New Year, I will do it in February. Actually, I was inspired to do this after reviewing all the talks for this year's MySQL Conference - what a snapshot into the state of where we are! It made me realize we've made important progress in the past year, worth taking a moment to celebrate it. So here we go...

Diversification

In the past few years there was a lot of fear and doubt about MySQL due to Oracle taking over the ownership. But if you ask me, I was more worried for MySQL because of MySQL itself. I've often said that if MySQL had been a healthy open source project - like the other 3 components in the LAMP stack - then most of the NoSQL technologies we've seen come about would never have been started as their own projects, because it would have been more natural to build those needs on top of MySQL. You could have had a key-value store (HandlerSocket, Memcache API...), sharding (Spider) and clustering (Galera). You could have had a graph storage engine (OQGraph engine isn't quite it, I understand it is internally an InnoDB table still?). There could even have been MapReduce functionality, although I do think the Hadoop ecosystem targets problems that actually are better solved without MySQL.

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Upcoming conferences: Highload++ Moscow and Percona Live London

Update: I won't be in Moscow after all. I was denied visa on grounds that my passport is beginning to fall apart and there wasn't time to get new passport, invitation and visa. Maybe next year - I was excited to go.

October brings 2 very interesting conferences. I will be speaking first on Oct 3rd at HighLoad++ in Moscow and a few weeks later on Oct Oct 25 at Percona Live in London. I will give a talk called Choosing a MySQL Replication / High Availability Solution which is based on my thinking developed in my recent blog post The ultimate MySQL high availability solution and many benchmarks and functional tests I've done while evaluating these technologies.

At Percona Live I will also give a second talk Fixed in Drizzle: No more GOTCHA's. It looked like none of the Drizzle core team would be able to attend the conference and as I was going to be there I volunteered to cover a Drizzle topic at the same time. This is a talk Stewart Smith has given a few times at earlier conferences which I liked and proposed to Percona. As it turns out, also Stewart will be in London after all, so there will be 2 Drizzle talks, I will still give the one I'm committed to.

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Mythbusters: How to configure InnoDB buffer pool on large MySQL servers

Mythbusters: How to configure InnoDB buffer poll on large MySQL servers

Yesterday I wrote about the dangers in using top on systems with 100+ GB of RAM, not to mention future systems with 1+ TB. A related topic is, how should I configure MySQL on such a large system?

There is a classic rule of thumb that on a dedicated MySQL server one should allocate 80% of memory to the InnoDB buffer pool. On a 128GB system that is 102.4 GB. This means that I would leave 25.6 GB of RAM "unused". So surely on these large systems, this old piece of advice cannot hold anymore. If the database was previously running on a server that in total had less than that altogether, it seems wrong to leave so much memory just unused. Let's label the old rule of thumb tentatively a "myth" and ask mythbusters to figure out a new MySQL configuration for us...

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top -M or when rounding errors get serious

We all know that a megabyte in binary system is not the same as one million bytes (in decimal system). But have you actually cared much about it? I have to admit I haven't. I know there is a small rounding error, but by and large I always treated 2^10 = 1 kB = 1024 bytes and 10^3 = 1 kB = 1000 as the same thing. (Update: Opening sentence was edited to remove units MB and MiB since it seems even I managed to use them backwards! The math in this article is correct. The rest of the article uses MB, GB and TB mostly to refer to binary magnitudes, which is apparently incorrect. See comments for wikipedia links and discussion.)

More importantly, when you move into larger numbers, rounding errors usually become even less important. Unfortunately, in this case they become bigger:

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How to make MySQL cool again

Jonathan Levin has an excellent blog post titled How to make MySQL cool again. It is almost word for word something I've wanted to write for a long time. Now I don't need to, thanks Jonathan.

Once again Blogger failed to post my comments to his site, so I will make some comments as a new post of my own instead. Jonathan actually lists things that exist already but isn't getting used enough. My list contains also a few things that I don't know if they exist or not.

Hi Jonathan

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